Oracle – How to get a list of user permission grants

IBM Infosphere Information Server (IIS), Oracle – How to get a list of user permission grants

IBM Infosphere Information Server (IIS)

Since the Infosphere, information server, repository, has to be installed manually with the scripts provided in the IBM software, sometimes you run into difficulties. So, here’s a quick script, which I have found useful in the past to identify user permissions for the IAUSER on Oracle database’s to help rundown discrepancies in user permissions.

 

SELECT *

FROM ALL_TAB_PRIVS

WHERE  GRANTEE = ‘iauser’

 

If we cannot run against the ALL_TAB_PRIVS view, then we can try the ALL_TAB_PRIVS view:

 

SELECT *

FROM USER_TAB_PRIVS

WHERE  GRANTEE = ‘iauser’

 

Related References

oracle help Center > Database Reference > ALL_TAB_PRIVS view

Netezza / PureData – Aginity for Netezza shortcut key list

Aginity for netezza shortcut key list

Aginity for Netezza

Recently, while working with a couple of my teammates on different projects I picked up a couple shortcut keys for Aginity for netezza, which I did not know existed. So, I thought about be nice to put a list of shortcut keys for future reference. I don’t use most of them very often, but I have flagged the ones that I have found to be frequently useful. I hope you find this useful as well.

Frequently Used By Me

Shortcut Keystrokes

Shortcut Description

Alt-C Complete Code Snippet
Alt-F4 Exit
Alt-Q Go to Query
Alt-R Go to Results
Alt-T Go to Tree
Atl-H User Query History
Ctrl-Alt-0 Goto Bookmark 0
Ctrl-Alt-1 Goto Bookmark 1
Ctrl-Alt-2 Goto Bookmark 2
Ctrl-Alt-3 Goto Bookmark 3
Ctrl-Alt-4 Goto Bookmark 4
Ctrl-Alt-5 Goto Bookmark 5
Ctrl-Alt-6 Goto Bookmark 6
Ctrl-Alt-7 Goto Bookmark 7
Ctrl-Alt-8 Goto Bookmark 8
Ctrl-Alt-9 Goto Bookmark 9
X Ctrl-Alt-C Comment Selection
Ctrl-Alt-Left Goto Previous Bookmark
Ctrl-Alt-Right Goto Next Bookmark
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-0 Set Bookmark 0
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-1 Set Bookmark 1
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-2 Set Bookmark 2
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-3 Set Bookmark 3
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-4 Set Bookmark 4
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-5 Set Bookmark 5
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-6 Set Bookmark 6
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-7 Set Bookmark 7
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-8 Set Bookmark 8
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-9 Set Bookmark 9
Ctrl-Alt-Shift-U Change select case
X Ctrl-Alt-U Uncomment Selection
Ctrl-Alt-W Word Wrap
X Ctrl-A Select All
Ctrl-B Toggle Object Browser
X Ctrl-C Copy
X Ctrl+Double click object name Find object in browser panel for current database
X Ctrl-F Find
Ctrl-F5 Execute as Single Batch
Ctrl-F6 Next Query Tab
Ctrl-G Goto Line
Ctrl-H Replace
Ctrl-N New Query Window
Ctrl-O Open SQL File
Ctrl-P Print
Ctrl-R Toggle
Ctrl-S Save Query
Ctrl-Shift-F6 Previous Query Tab
Ctrl-Shift-U Make selection UPPER case
Ctrl-T Add New Query Editor
Ctrl-U Make selection LOWER case
Ctrl-V Paste
X Ctrl-X Cut
X Ctrl-Y Redo
X Ctrl-Z Undo
F11 Toggle full screen
F12 Select Query at Cursor
 X F3 Find Again
F5 Execute
F8 Explain
F9 Toggle Bookmark
Shift-F5 Execute All

Related References

 

Netezza / PureData – Table Describe SQL

Netezza Puredata Table Describe SQL

Netezza / Puredata Table Describe SQL

If you want to describe a PureData / Netezza table in SQL, it can be done, but Netezza doesn’t have a describe command.  Here is a quick SQL, which will give the basic structure of a table or a view.  Honestly, if you have Aginity Generating the DDL is fast and more informative, at least to me.  If you have permissions to access NZSQL you can also use the slash commands (e.g. \d).

Example Netezza Table Describe SQL

select  name as Table_name,

owner as Table_Owner,

Createdate as Table_Created_Date,

type as Table_Type,

Database as Database_Name,

schema as Database_Schema,

attnum as Field_Order,

attname as Field_Name,

format_type as Field_Type,

attnotnull as Field_Not_Null_Indicator,

attlen as Field_Length

from _v_relation_column

where

name='<<Table Name Here>>’

Order by attnum;

 

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Command-line options for nzsql, Internal slash options

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza getting started tips, About the Netezza data warehouse appliance, Commands and queries, Basic Netezza SQL information, Commonly used nzsql internal slash commands

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL introduction, The nzsql command options, Slash options

 

 

Aginity For Netezza – How to Generate DDL

Aginity, Aginity for Netezza, Netezza, PureData, DDL, SQL

Aginity

How to Generate Netezza Object DDL

In ‘Aginity for Netezza’ this process is easy, if you have a user with sufficient permissions.

The basic process is:

  • In the object browser, navigate to the Database
  • select the Object (e.g. table, view, stored procedure)
  • Right Click, Select ‘Script’ > ‘DDL to query window’
  • The Object DDL will appear in the query window
Create DDL to Query Window

Create DDL to Query Window

Related References

 

Netezza / PureData – Substring Function Example

SQL (Structured Query Language), Netezza PureData – Substring Function Example, Substr

Netezza / PureData – Substring Function Example

The function Substring (SUBSTR) in Netezza PureData provides the capability parse character type fields based on position within a character string.

Substring Functions Basic Syntax

SUBSTRING Function Syntax

SUBSTRING(<<CharacterField>>,<< StartingPosition integer>>, <<for Number of characters Integer–optional>>)

 

SUBSTR Function Syntax

SUBSTR((<>,<< StartingPosition integer>>, <>)

 

Example Substring SQL

Netezza / PureData Substring Example

Netezza / PureData Substring Example

Substring SQL Used In Example

SELECT  LOCATIONTEXT

— From the Left Of the String

— Using SUBSTRING Function

,’==SUBSTRING From the Left==’ as Divider1

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,1,5) as Beggining_Using_SUBSTRING_LFT

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,7,6) as Middle_Using_SUBSTRING_LFT

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,15) as End_Using_SUBSTRING_LFT

,’==SUBSTR From the Left==’ as Divider2

—Using SUBSTR Function

 

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,1,5) as Beggining_Using_SUBSTR_LFT

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,7,6) as Middle_Using_SUBSTR_LFT

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,15) as End_Using_SUBSTR_LFT

— From the right of the String

,’==SUBSTRING From the Right==’ as Divider3

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-18, 8) as Beggining_Using_SUBSTRING_RGT

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-9, 6) as Middle_Using_SUBSTRING_RGT

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-1) as End_Using_SUBSTRING_RGT

,’==SUBSTR From the right==’ as Divider4

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-18, 8) as Beggining_Using_SUBSTR_RGT

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-9, 6) as Middle_Using_SUBSTR_RGT

,SUBSTR(LOCATIONTEXT,LENGTH(LOCATIONTEXT)-1) as End_Using_SUBSTR_RGT

FROM BLOG.D_ZIPCODE

where STATE = ‘PR’

AND CITY = ‘REPTO ROBLES’;

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.1.0

IBM Netezza Database User’s Guide, Netezza SQL basics, Functions and operators, Functions, Standard string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL command reference, Functions

Netezza / PureData – Substring Function On Specific Delimiter

SQL (Structured Query Language), Netezza / PureData - Substring Function On Specific Delimiter, substr

Netezza / PureData – Substring Function On Specific Delimiter

The function Substring (SUBSTR) in Netezza PureData provides the capability parse character type fields based on position within a character string.  However, it is possible, with a little creativity, to substring based on the position of a character in the string. This approach give more flexibility to the substring function and makes the substring more useful in many cases. This approach works fine with either the substring or substr functions.  In this example, I used the position example provide the numbers for the string command.

 

Example Substring SQL

Netezza PureData Substring Function On Specific Character In String, substring, substr

Netezza PureData Substring Function On Specific Character In String

 

Substring SQL Used In Example

select LOCATIONTEXT

,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT) as Comma_Postion_In_String

—without Adjustment

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT)) as Substring_On_Comma

—Adjusted to account for extra space

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT)+2) as Substring_On_Comma_Ajusted

,’==Breaking_Up_The_Sting==’ as Divider

— breaking up the string

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,1, position(‘ ‘ in LOCATIONTEXT)-1) as Beggining_of_String

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,position(‘ ‘ in LOCATIONTEXT)+1, position(‘ ‘ in LOCATIONTEXT)-1) as Middle_Of_String

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT)+2) as End_Of_String

 

FROM Blog.D_ZIPCODE

where STATE = ‘PR’

AND CITY = ‘REPTO ROBLES’

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Character string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.1.0

IBM Netezza Database User’s Guide, Netezza SQL basics, Functions and operators, Functions, Standard string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL command reference, Functions

Aginity for Netezza – How to Display Query Results in a Single Row Grid

Aginity

Aginity

Displaying your Netezza query results in a grid can be useful.  Especially, when desiring to navigation left and right to see an entire rows data and to avoid the distraction of other rows being displayed on the screen. I use this capability in Aginity when I’m proofing code results and/or validating data in a table.

How To switch to the Single Row Grid

  • Execute your Query
  • When the results return, right click on the gray bar above your results (where you see the drag a column box
  • Choose the ‘Show a Single Row Grid’ Menu item

    Aginity Show Single Row Grid

    Aginity Show Single Row Grid

 

Grid View Change

  • Your result display will change from a horizontal row to a vertical grid as shown below
Aginity Single Row Grid Display

Aginity Single Row Grid Display

How to Navigate in the Single Row Grid

  • To navigate in the single row grid, use the buttons provided at the bottom of the results section.
Aginity Single Row Grid Navigation Buttons

Aginity Single Row Grid Navigation Buttons

Related References

 

Netezza / PureData – Position Function

SQL (Structured Query Language), Netezza PureData Position Function, SQL, Position Function

Netezza / PureData Position Function

 

The position function in Netezza is a simple enough function, it just returns the number of a specified character within a string (char, varchar, nvarchar, etc.) or zero if the character not found. The real power of this command is when you imbed it with character function, which require a numeric response, but the character may be inconsistent from row to row in a field.

The Position Function’s Basic Syntax

position(<<character or Character String>> in <<CharacterFieldName>>)

 

Example Position Function SQL

Netezza PureData Position Function, SQL, Position Function

Netezza PureData Position Function

 

Position Function SQL Used in Example

select LOCATIONTEXT, CITY

,’==Postion Funtion Return Values==’ as Divider

,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT) as Postion_In_Nbr_String

,position(‘-‘ in LOCATIONTEXT) as Postion_Value_Not_Found

,’==Postion Combined with Substring Function==’ as Divider2

,SUBSTRING(LOCATIONTEXT,position(‘,’ in LOCATIONTEXT)+2) as Position_Used_in_Substring_Function

FROM Blog.D_ZIPCODE  where STATE = ‘MN’ AND CITY = ‘RED WING’ limit 1;

 

 

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.1.0

IBM Netezza Database User’s Guide, Netezza SQL basics, Functions and operators, Functions, Standard string functions

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL command reference, Functions

 

Data Modeling – Column Data Classification

Data Modeling, Column Data Classification, Field Data Classification

Data Modeling

 

Column Data Classification

When analyzing individual column data, at its most foundational level, column data can be classified by their fundamental use/characteristics.  Granted, when you start rolling up the structure into multiple columns, table structure and table relationship, then other classifications/behaviors, such as keys (primary and foreign), indexes, and distribution come into play.  However, many times when working with existing data sets it is essential to understand the nature the existing data to begin the modeling and information governance process.

Column Data Classification

Generally, individual columns can be classified into the classifications:

  • Identifier — A column/field which is unique to a row and/or can identify related data (e.g., Person ID, National identifier, ). Basically, think primary key and/or foreign key.
  • Indicator — A column/field, often called a Flag, that has a binary condition (e.g., True or False, Yes or No, Female or Male, Active or Inactive). Frequently used to identify compliance with complex with a specific business rule.
  • Code — A column/field that has a distinct and defined set of values, often abbreviated (e.g., State Code, Currency Code)
  • Temporal — A column/field that contains some type date, timestamp, time, interval, or numeric duration data
  • Quantity — A column/field that contains a numeric value (decimals, integers, etc.) and is not classified as an Identifier or Code (e.g., Price, Amount, Asset Value, Count)
  • Text — A column/field that contains alphanumeric values, possibly long text, and is not classified as an Identifier or Code (e.g., Name, Address, Long Description, Short Description)
  • Large Object (LOB)– A column/field that contains data traditional long text fields or binary data like graphics. The large objects can be broadly classified as Character Large Objects (CLOBs), Binary Large Objects (BLOBs), and Double-Byte Character Large Object (DBCLOB or NCLOB).

Related References

What is a Common Data Model (CDM)?

Data Model, Common Data Model, CDM, What is a Common Data Model (CDM)

Data Model

 

What is a Common Data Model (CDM)?

 

A Common Data Model (CDM) is a share data structure designed to provide well-formed and standardized data structures within an industry (e.g. medical, Insurance, etc.) or business channel (e.g. Human resource management, Asset Management, etc.), which can be applied to provide organizations a consistent unified view of business information.   These common models can be leveraged as accelerators by organizations form the foundation for their information, including SOA interchanges, Mashup, data vitalization, Enterprise Data Model (EDM), business intelligence (BI), and/or to standardize their data models to improve meta data management and data integration practices.

Related references

IBM, IBM Analytics

IBM Analytics, Technology, Database Management, Data Warehousing, Industry Models

github.com

Observational Health Data Sciences and Informatics (OHDSI)/Common Data Model

Oracle

Oracle Technology Network, Database, More Key Features, Utilities Data Model

Oracle

Industries, Communications, Service Providers, Products, Data Mode, Oracle Communications Data Model

Oracle

Oracle Technology Network, Database, More Key Features, Airline data Model

 

Netezza / PureData – How to add multiple columns to a Netezza table in one SQL

add multiple columns to a Netezza table , alter table

SQL (Structured Query Language)

 

I had this example floating around in a notepad for a while, but I find myself coming back it occasionally.  So, I thought I would add it to this blog for future reference.

The Table Alter Process

This is an outline of the Alter table process I follow, for reference, in case it is helpful.

  • Generate DDL in Aginity and make backup original table structure
  • Perform Insert into backup table from original table
  • Create Alter SQL
  • Execute Alter SQL
  • Refresh Aginity table columns
  • Generate new DDL
  • visually validate DDL Structure
  • If correct, archive copy of DDL to version control system
  • Preform any update commands, if required, required to populate the new columns.
  • Execute post alter table cleanup
    • Groom Versions
    • Groom table
    • Generate statistics
  • Once the any required processes and the data have been validated, drop the backup table.

 

Basic Alter SQL Command Structure

Here is the basic syntax for adding multiple columns:

ALTER TABLE <<OWNER>>.<<TABLENAME>>

ADD COLUMN <<FieldName1>> <<Field Type>> <<Constraint, if applicable>>

, <<FieldName2>> <<Field Type>> <<Constraint, if applicable>>;

 

Example Alter SQL Command to a Multiple Columns

Here is a quick example, which is adding four columns:

Example SQL Adding Multiple Columns

ALTER TABLE BLOG.PRODUCT_DIM

ADD COLUMN MANUFACTURING_PLANT_KEY NUMERIC(6,0) NOT NULL DEFAULT 0

, LEAD_TIME_PRODUCTION NUMERIC(2,0)  NOT NULL DEFAULT 0

, PRODUCT_CYCLE CHARACTER VARYING(15)  NOT NULL DEFAULT ‘ ‘::”NVARCHAR”

, PRODUCT_CLASS CHARACTER VARYING(2)  NOT NULL  DEFAULT ‘ ‘::”NVARCHAR” ;

 

Cleanup Table SQL Statements

GROOM TABLE BLOG.PRODUCT_DIM VERSIONS;

GROOM TABLE BLOG.PRODUCT_DIM;

GENERATE STATISTICS ON BLOG.PRODUCT_DIM;

 

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics, Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL command reference, ALTER TABLE

Netezza / PureData – Casting Numbers to Character Data Type

Cast Conversion Format

Cast Conversion Format

I noticed that someone has been searching for this example on my site, so, here is a quick example of how to cast number data to a character data type.  I ran this SQL example in netezza and it worked fine.

Basic Casting Conversion Format

cast(<<FieldName>> as <<IntegerType_or_Alias>>) as <<FieldName>>

 

Example Casting Number to Character Data Type SQL

 

SELECT
—-Casting Integer to Character Data Type —————

SUBMITDATE_SRKY as  SUBMITDATE_SRKY_INTEGER
, cast(SUBMITDATE_SRKY as  char(10)) as Integer_to_CHAR
, cast(SUBMITDATE_SRKY as Varchar(10)) as Integer_to_VARCHAR
, cast(SUBMITDATE_SRKY as Varchar(10)) as Integer_to_VARCHAR
, cast(SUBMITDATE_SRKY as Nchar(10)) as Integer_to_NCHAR
, cast(SUBMITDATE_SRKY as NVarchar(10)) as Integer_to_NVARCHAR

—-Casting Double Precision Number to Character Data Type —————

, HOST_CPU_SECS as DOUBLE_PRECISION_NUMBER
, cast(HOST_CPU_SECS as  char(30)) as DOUBLE_PRECISION_to_CHAR
, cast(HOST_CPU_SECS as Varchar(30)) as DOUBLE_PRECISION_to_VARCHAR
, cast(HOST_CPU_SECS as Varchar(30)) as DOUBLE_PRECISION_to_VARCHAR
, cast(HOST_CPU_SECS as Nchar(30)) as DOUBLE_PRECISION_to_NCHAR
, cast(HOST_CPU_SECS as NVarchar(30)) as DOUBLE_PRECISION_to_NVARCHAR

—-Casting Numeric to Character Data Type —————

, TOTALRUNTIME  as NUMERIC_FIELD
, cast(TOTALRUNTIME as  char(30)) as NUMERIC_FIELD_to_CHAR
, cast(TOTALRUNTIME as Varchar(30)) as NUMERIC_FIELD_to_VARCHAR
, cast(TOTALRUNTIME as Varchar(30)) as NUMERIC_FIELD_to_VARCHAR
, cast(TOTALRUNTIME as Nchar(30)) as NUMERIC_FIELD_to_NCHAR
, cast(TOTALRUNTIME as NVarchar(30)) as NUMERIC_FIELD_to_NVARCHAR
FROM NETEZZA_QUERY_FACT ;

Related References

IBM, IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics,Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza stored procedures, NZPLSQL statements and grammar, Variables and constants, Data types and aliases

IBM, IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics,Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation,SQL statement grammar,Explicit and implicit casting, Summary of Netezza casting

IBM, IBM Knowledge Center, PureData System for Analytics,Version 7.2.1

IBM Netezza database user documentation ,Netezza SQL basics,Netezza SQL extensions

 

PureData / Netezza – What date/time ranges are supported by Netezza?

SQL (Structured Query Language), Date/Time ranges supported by Netezza

Date/Time ranges supported by Netezza

Here is a synopsis of the temporal ranges ( date, time, and timestamp), which Netezza / PureData supports.

Temporal Type

Supported Ranges

Size In Bytes

Date

A month, day, and year. Values range from January 1, 0001, to December 31, 9999. 4 bytes

Time

An hour, minute, and second to six decimal places (microseconds). Values range from 00:00:00.000000 to 23:59:59.999999. 8 bytes

Related References

Temporal data types

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Data types, Temporal data types

Netezza date/time data type representations

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza user-defined functions, Data type helper API reference, Temporal data type helper functions, Netezza date/time data type representations

Date/time functions

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Netezza SQL extensions, Date/time functions

Netezza / PureData – How to add a Foreign Key

DDL (Data Definition Language), Netezza PureData How to add a Foreign Key

DDL (Data Definition Language)

Adding a forging key to tables in Netezza / PureData is a best practice; especially, when working with dimensionally modeled data warehouse structures and with modern governance, integration (including virtualization), presentation semantics (including reporting, business intelligence and analytics).

Foreign Key (FK) Guidelines

  • A primary key must be defined on the table and fields (or fields) to which you intend to link the foreign key
  • Avoid using distribution keys as foreign keys
  • Foreign Key field should not be nullable
  • Your foreign key link field(s) must be of the same format(s) (e.g. integer to integer, etc.)
  • Apply standard naming conventions to constraint name:
    • FK_<<Constraint_Name>>_<<Number>>
    • <<Constraint_Name>>_FK<<Number>>
  • Please note that foreign key constraints are not enforced in Netezza

Steps to add a Foreign Key

The process for adding foreign keys involves just a few steps:

  • Verify guidelines above
  • Alter table add constraint SQL command
  • Run statistics, which is optional, but strongly recommended

Basic Foreign Key SQL Command Structure

Here is the basic syntax for adding Foreign key:

ALTER TABLE <<Owner>>.<<NAME_OF_TABLE_BEING_ALTERED>>

ADD CONSTRAINT <<Constraint_Name>>_fk<Number>>

FOREIGN KEY (<<Field_Name or Field_Name List>>) REFERENCES <<Owner>>.<<target_FK_Table_Name>.(<<Field_Name or Field_Name List>>) <<On Update | On Delete>> action;

Example Foreign Key SQL Command

This is a simple one field example of the foreign key (FK)

 

ALTER TABLE Blog.job_stage_fact

ADD CONSTRAINT job_stage_fact_host_dim_fk1

FOREIGN KEY (hostid) REFERENCES Blog.host_dim(hostid) ON DELETE cascade ON UPDATE no action;

Related References

Alter Table

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL command reference, Alter Table, constraints

 

 

Database – What is a foreign key?

Acronyms, Abbreviations, Terms, And Definitions, DDL (Data Definition Language), What is a foreign key

Acronyms, Abbreviations, Terms, And Definitions

Definition of a Foreign Key

  • A foreign Key (FK) is a constraint that references the unique primary key (PK) of another table.

Facts About Foreign Keys

  • Foreign Keys act as a cross-reference between tables linking the foreign key (Child record) to the Primary key (parent record) of another table, which establishing a link/relationship between the table keys
  • Foreign keys are not enforced by all RDBMS
  • The concept of referential integrity is derived from foreign key theory
  • Because Foreign keys involve more than one table relationship, their implementation can be more complex than primary keys
  • A foreign-key constraint implicitly defines an index on the foreign-key column(s) in the child table, however, manually defining a matching index may improve join performance in some database
  • The SQL, normally, provides the following referential integrity actions for deletions, when enforcing foreign-keys

Cascade

  • The deletion of a parent (primary key) record may cause the deletion of corresponding foreign-key records.

No Action

  • Forbids the deletion of a parent (primary key) record, if there are dependent foreign-key records.   No Action does not mean to suppress the foreign-key constraint.

Set null

  • The deletion of a parent (primary key) record causes the corresponding foreign-key to be set to null.

Set default

  • The deletion of a record causes the corresponding foreign-keys be set to a default value instead of null upon deletion of a parent (primary key) record

Related References

 

What are the Core Capability of Infosphere Information Server?

Information Server Core (IIS) Capabilities

Information Server Core (IIS) Capabilities

 

Three Core Capabilities of Information Server

InfoSphere Information Server (IIS) has three core capabilities:

  • Information Governance
  • Data Integration
  • Data Quality

What the Core Capabilities Provide

The three-core capability translate in to the high-level business processes:

Information Governance – Understand and collaborate

Provides a centrally managed repository and approach, which provides:

  • Information blueprints
  • Relationship discovery across data sources
  • Information technology (IT)-to-business mapping

Data Integration – Transform and deliver

A data integration capability, which provides:

  • Transformation
    • Massive scalability
    • Power for any complexity
    • Total traceability
  • Delivery
    • Data capture at any time
    • Delivery anywhere
    • Big data readiness

Data Quality – Cleanse and monitor

To turn data assets into trusted information:

  • Analysis & validation
  • Data cleansing
  • Data quality rules & management

Related References

IBM Knowledge Center, InfoSphere Information Server Version 11.5.0

Overview of IBM InfoSphere Information Server, Introduction to InfoSphere Information Server

 

 

 

Netezza / PureData – How to rebuild a Netezza view in Aginity

How To Generate View or table DDL in Aginity For Netezza PureData

How To Generate View or table DDL in Aginity For Netezza

 

Rebuilding Netezza view sometimes becomes necessary when the view’s source table have changed underneath the view.  Rebuilding a view can be done on Netezza or in Aginity. In Aginity, it is a simple process, assume your user has permissions to create or replace a view.  The process breaks down into just a few steps:

Generate the create / replace view SQL of the original view into the query window, if you don’t have it already

In the object browser:

  • Navigate to the Database and view you wish to rebuild
  • Select the view and right click
  • Select ‘Scripts’, then ‘DDL to Query window’

Make may updates to create / replace View SQL

  • This step is not always necessary, sometimes the changes which invalided the view did not actually impact the code of the view. If changes are necessary, make may updates to the SQL code.

Execute The code

  • This I usually do by choosing the ‘Execute as a single batch’ option.  Make sure the code executes successfully.

Verify the view

  • To verify the simply execute a select statement and make it executes without errors and/or warning.

Related References

 

SFDC – Using a timestamp literal in a where clause

Salesforce Connector

Salesforce Connector

Working with timestamp literals in the Infosphere SFDC Connector soql is much like working date literals.  So, here a quick example which may save you some time.

SOQL Timestamp String Literals Where Clause Rules

Basically, the timestamp pattern is straight forward and like the process for dates, but there are some differences. The basic rules are for a soql where clause:

  • No quotes
  • No functions
  • No Casting function, or casting for the where soql where clause to read it
  • It only applies to datetime fields
  • A Timestamp identifier ‘T’
  • And the ISO 1806 time notations

Example SOQL Timestamp String Literals

So, here are a couple of timestamp string literal examples in SQL:

  • 1901-01-01T00:00:00-00:00
  • 2016-01-31T00:00:00-00:00
  • 9999-10-31T00:00:00-00:00

Example SQL with Timestamp String Literal Where Clause

 

Select e.Id,

e.AccountId,

e.StartDateTime

From Event e

WHERE e.StartDateTime > 2014-10-31T00:00:00-00:00

 

Related References

Salesforce Developer Documentation

Home, Developer Documentation, Force.com SOQL and SOSL Reference

https://developer.salesforce.com/docs/atlas.en-us.soql_sosl.meta/soql_sosl/sforce_api_calls_soql_select_dateformats.htm

Salesforce Workbench

Home, Technical Library, Workbench

W3C

Date Time Formats

 

Netezza / PureData – Two ways to get Numeric Day of Year

Netezza PureData Numeric Day Of Year

Netezza PureData Numeric Day Of Year

 

Two Ways To Get Numeric Day of Year

In Netezza there are at least two way to get the numeric day of year.  These are using:

  • The cast ‘DDD’ function or
  • The Extract ‘doy’ function

Example SQL for Numeric Day of Year

Here is a quick sample SQL of two ways to get the Numeric day of year in Netezza / PureData.

SELECT

CURRENT_DATE as “CURRENT_DATE”,

—————-Day Of Year Cast Method  ———————

 

TO_CHAR(CURRENT_DATE,’DDD’) AS CALENDAR_DAY_OF_YEAR_NUMBER_CAST_METHOD,

————Day Of Year Extract Method ———————–

DATE_PART(‘doy’, current_date) AS CALENDAR_DAY_OF_YEAR_NUMBER_EXTRACT_METHOD

FROM _V_DUAL;

 

Related References

Explicit and implicit casting

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, SQL statement grammar, Explicit and implicit casting

Extract date and time values

PureData System for Analytics, PureData System for Analytics 7.2.1, IBM Netezza database user documentation, Netezza SQL basics, Functions and operators, Functions, Extract date and time values