Parallel jobs on Windows fail with APT_IOPort::readBlkVirt;error

APT_IOPort::readBlkVirt Error Screenshot

APT_IOPort::readBlkVirt Error Screenshot

This a known error for windows systems and applies to DataStage and DataQuality jobs using the any or all the three join type stages (Join, Merge, and Lookup).

Error Message

  • <<Link name>>,0: APT_IOPort::readBlkVirt: read for block header, partition 0, [fd 4], returned -1 with errno 10,054 (Unknown error)

Message ID

  • IIS-DSEE-TFIO-00223

Applies To

  • Windows systems only
  • Parallel Engine Jobs the three join type stages (Join, Merge, and Lookup). It does not apply to Server Engine jobs.
  • Infosphere Information Server (IIS), Datastage and DataQuality 9.1 and higher

The Fix

  • Add the APT_NO_IOCOMM_OPTIMIZATION in project administrator and set to blank or 0. I left it blank so it would not impact other jobs
  • Add the environment variable to the job producing the error and set to 1

What it APT_NO_IOCOMM_OPTIMIZATION Does

  • Sets the use of shared memory as the transport type, rather than using the default sockets transport type.
  • Note that in most cases sockets transport type is faster, so, you likely will not to set this across the project as the default for all job. It is best to apply it as necessary for problematic jobs.

Related References

InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Version 9.1 Job Compatibility

IBM Support, JR54078: PARALLEL JOBS ON WINDOWS FAIL WITH APT_IOPORT::READBLKVIRT; ERROR

IBM Support, Information Server DataStage job fails with unknown error 10,054.

 

DataStage – How to Pass the Invocation ID from one Sequence to another

DataStage Invocation ID Passing Pattern Overview

DataStage Invocation ID Passing Pattern Overview

When you are controlling a chain of sequences in the job stream and taking advantage of reusable (multiple instances) jobs it is useful to be able to pass the Invocation ID from the master controlling sequence and have it passed down and assigned to the job run.  This can easily be done with needing to manual enter the values in each of the sequences, by leveraging the DSJobInvocationId variable.  For this to work:

  • The job must have ‘Allow Multiple Instance’ enabled
  • The Invocation Id must be provided in the Parent sequence must have the Invocation Name entered
  • The receiving child sequence will have the invocation variable entered
  • At runtime, a DataStage invocation id instance of the multi-instance job will generate with its own logs.

Variable Name

  • DSJobInvocationId

Note

This approach allows for the reuse of job and the assignment of meaningful instance extension names, which are managed for a single point of entry in the object tree.

Related References: 

IBM Knowledge Center > InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0

InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage > Designing DataStage and QualityStage jobs > Building sequence jobs > Sequence job activities > Job Activity properties

What is the convert function in Datastage?

Algorithm

Algorithm

 

What is the convert function in Datastage?

In its simplest form, the convert function in Infosphere DataStage is a string replacement operation.  Convert can be used to replace a specific character, a list of characters, or a unicode character (e.g. thumbs Up Sign or Grinning Face).

Convert Syntax

convert(‘<<Value to be replaced’,'<<Replacement value >>’,<<Input field>>)

Using the Convert Function to remove a list of Characters

Special Characters in DataStage Handles/converts special characters in a transformer stage, which can cause issues in XML processing and certain databases.

Convert a list of General Characters

Convert(“;:?\+&,*`#’$()|^~@{}[]%!”,”, TrimLeadingTrailing(Lnk_In.Description))

Convert Decimal and Double Quotes

Convert(‘ ” . ‘,”, Lnk_In.Description)

Convert Char(0)

This example replaces Char(0) with nothing essentially removing it as padding and/or space.

convert(char(0),”,Lnk_In.Description)

 

Related References

String functions

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Developing parallel jobs, Parallel transform functions, String functions

Netezza – [SQLCODE=HY000][Native=46] ERROR: External Table : count of bad input rows reached maxerrors limit

SQL (Structured Query Language)

SQL (Structured Query Language)

While helping a customer we encountered the [SQLCODE=HY000][Native=46] ERROR, which was a new one for me. So here are a few notes to help the next unlucky soul may run into the error.

Netezza Error Reason:

  • [SQLCODE=HY008][Native=51] Operation canceled; [SQLCODE=HY000][Native=46] ERROR: External Table : count of bad input rows reached maxerrors limit

What Does the Error Mean

  • In a nutshell, it mean invalid data was submitted and could not be inserted.

What To Do

  • Basically, you need to go to the Netezza logs to see why the rows were reject and resolve input data error, then resubmit your transactions. The logs are temporary and reused, so, you need to get to them before they are over written.

Where Are The Data Logs

  • In linux the logs can be found in /tmp:

For nzload Methods Logs

  • /tmp/database name.table name.nzlog
  • /tmp/database name.table name.nzbad

For External Table Load Logs

  • /tmp/external table name.log
  • /tmp/external table name.bad

Related References

 

Netezza Connector Stage, Table name required warning for User-defined SQL Write mode

Recently, while working at a customer site and I encountered an anomaly in the Netezza Connector stage, when choosing ‘User-defined SQL’ write mode, the ‘Table name’ displays a caution / warning even though a table name should not be required.  If you are using a user-defined SQL statement and/or have parametrized your SQL scripts to make the job reusable, each SQL and/or SQL script would have its own schema and table name being passed in.  After some investigation, a workaround was found, which both allows you to populate table name and leverage with different schema and table names within your SQl statement and/or.

Table Name, User-defined SQL, Warning

You will notice, in a screen shot below the ‘User-defined SQL’, ‘write mode’, property has been chosen, a parameter has been placed in the ‘User-defined SQL’ property, and ‘Read user defined SQL from a file’ property has been set to ‘Yes’.  However, yellow triangle displays on the ‘Table name’ property marking it as a required item.  This, also, occurs when placing SQL statements in the User-defined SQL property, whether reading from a file of not.

Netezza Connector User-Defined SQL , Table Name Required , Warning

Netezza Connector User-Defined SQL , Table Name Required , Warning

Table Name, User-defined SQL, Warning Workaround

After some experimentation, the workaround is straight forward enough.  Basically, give the ‘table name’ property something to read successfully, so it can move on to the user-defined SQL and/or user defined SQl file script, which the process actually needs to execute. In the screenshot below, the SYSTEM.DEFINITION_SCHEMA._V_DUAL view was used, so, it could be found, then the script file passed by the parameter runs fine.  Another view or table, which the DataStage user has access to, should just as well.

Netezza Connector, User-Define SQL, Table Name Required Fix

Netezza Connector, User-Define SQL, Table Name Required Fix

Related References

 

IBM InfoSphere DataStage Type Conversion Functions

I have started to find type conversion functions, which I searched for and are not included in the IBM list of type conversion function.  So, I’m supplementing the existing IBM list with functions omitted from their list, as I find them, on this page.

Notes:

  • Use the type conversion functions to change [Cast] the data type of an argument.
  • Square brackets indicate an argument is optional.
  • Default date format is %yyyy-%mm-%dd.
  • Examples, functions as they appears in a Derivation field in the Transformer stage.

asInteger

When using “asInteger” function in a parallel transformer to convert char, nvarchar,  varchar or number data to an integer.  All non-numeric data, including whitespaces, must be removed prior to the conversion.  

  • Input: code (char, nvarchar, varchar, number)
  • Output: number (integer)
  • Examples. The following example outputs an integer from an NVARCHAR input field.

AsInteger(src_InputFile1.InventoryCount)

Char

Generates an ASCII character from its numeric code value. You can optionally specify the allow8bits argument to convert 8-bit ASCII values.

  • Input: code (number), [allow8bits]
  • Output: result (char)
  • Examples. The following example outputs the ASCII code 65 as the character A.

Char(65)

DateToString

Returns the string representation of the given date. The format of the string can optionally be specified.

  • Input: date (date), [format (string)]
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples. The following example outputs the date contained in the column mylink.mydate to a string. If mylink.mydate contains the date 18th August, 2009, then the output string is “2009-08-18”:

DateToString(mylink.mydate)

The following example outputs the date contained in the column mylink.mydate to a string with the format dd:mm:yyyy. If mylink.mydate contained the date 18th August, 2009, then the output string would be “18:08:2009”:

DateToString(mylink.mydate, “%dd:%mm:%yyyy”)

DateToDecimal

Returns the given date as a packed decimal value. If your target decimal specifies a scale, part of the date appears after the decimal point. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the date is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is “%yyyy%mm%dd”, so, for example, the date 2009-08-25 is stored as the decimal number 20090825. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%yyyy-%mm-%dd”, because the hyphen character (-) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%yyyy (four-digit year)

%yy (two-digit year)

%NNNNyy (two-digit year with cutoff)

%mm (two-digit month)

%dd (two-digit day of month)

%ddd (three-digit day of year)

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

  • Input: basedate (date) [, format (string)]
  • Output: converted_date (decimal)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.basedate contains the date 2012-08-18, then the following function stores the date as the decimal number 18082012:

DateToDecimal (mylink.basedate, “%dd%mm%yyyy”)

If the column mylink.basedate contains the date 2012-08-18, and the target column has a length of 10 and a scale of 2, then the following function stores the date as the decimal number 201208.18:

DateToDecimal (mylink.basedate)

DecimalToDate

Returns the given packed decimal as a date. Both the sign and the scale of the decimal number are ignored when it is converted to a date. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the date is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is “%yyyy%mm%dd”, so, for example, the date 2009-08-25 is stored as the decimal number 20090825. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%yyyy-%mm-%dd”, because the hyphen character (-) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%yyyy (four-digit year)

%yy (two-digit year)

%NNNNyy (two-digit year with cutoff)

%mm (two-digit month)

%dd (two-digit day of month)

%ddd (three-digit day of year)

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

  • Input: basedec (decimal) [, format (string)]
  • Output: date
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mydecdata contains the value 18082012, then the following function returns the date 2012-08-18:

DecimalToDate (mylink.basedate, “%dd%mm%yyyy”)

If the column mylink.mydecdata contains the value -201208.18, then the following function returns the date 2012-08-18:

DecimalToDate (mylink.basedate)

DecimalToDecimal

Returns the given decimal in decimal representation with precision and scale specified in the target column definition. The argument rtype optionally specifies a rounding type, and is set to one of the following values:

ceil. Round the source field toward positive infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 2, -1.6 -> -1.

floor. Round the source field toward negative infinity. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.4 -> -2.

round_inf. Round or truncate the source field toward the nearest representable value, breaking ties by rounding positive values toward positive infinity and negative values toward negative infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 1, 1.5 -> 2, -1.4 -> -1, -1.5 -> -2.

trunc_zero. Discard any fractional digits to the right of the rightmost fractional digit supported in the destination, regardless of sign. For example, if the destination is an integer, all fractional digits are truncated. If the destination is another decimal with a smaller scale, round or truncate to the scale size of the destination decimal. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.6 -> -1.

  • Input: decimal (decimal) [,rtype (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 2.5345, the following function returns the decimal number 00000002.54.

DecimalToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”ceil”)

The following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DecimalToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”floor”)

The following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DecimalToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”trunc_zero”)

The following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DecimalToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”round_inf”)

In all these examples, the target decimal has a length of 10 and a scale of 2.

DecimalToDFloat

Returns the given decimal in dfloat representation. The argument “fix_zero” optionally specifies that all zero decimal values are regarded as valid (by default, decimal numbers comprising all zeros are treated as invalid).

  • Input: decimal (decimal) [,”fix_zero”]
  • Output: result (dfloat)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00000004.00 the following function returns the dfloat number 4.00000000000000000E+00.

DecimalToDFloat(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.00 the following function returns the dfloat number 1.23440000000000000E+04.

DecimalToDFloat(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.120 the following function returns the dfloat number 1.23441200000000010E+04.

DecimalToDFloat(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.120 the following function returns the dfloat number 1.23441200000000010E+04.

DecimalToDFloat(mylink.mydec)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.000 the following function returns the dfloat number 1.23440000000000000E+04.

DecimalToDFloat(mylink.mydec)

DecimalToString

Returns the given decimal as a string. The argument “fix_zero” optionally specifies that all zero decimal values are regarded as valid (by default, decimal numbers comprising all zeros are treated as invalid). This covers the case where the sign bits of the packed decimal representation are all 0 as well as all the content digits. This cast is not considered valid unless “fix_zero” is true.

  • Input: decimal (decimal) [,”fix_zero”]
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00000004.00, the following function returns the string “4”:

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”suppress_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00000004.00, the following function returns the string “0000000000000000000000000004.0000000000”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.00, the following function returns the string “12344”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”suppress_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.00, the following function returns the string “0000000000000000000000012344.0000000000”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.120, the following function returns the string “0000000000000000000000012344.1200000000”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”fix_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.120, the following function returns the string “12344.12”:

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec,”suppress_zero”)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.120, the following function returns the string “0000000000000000000000012344.120000000”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec)

If the column mylink.mydec contains the decimal number 00012344.000, the following function returns the string “0000000000000000000000012344.0000000000”.

DecimalToString(mylink.mydec)

DecimalToTime

Returns the given packed decimal as a time. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the time is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is ” %hh%nn%ss”, so, for example, the time 14:03:22 is stored as the decimal number 140322. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%hh:%nn:%ss”, because the colon character (:) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%hh (two-digit hours using 24-hour clock)

%nn (two-digit minutes)

%ss (two-digit seconds)

%ss.N (two-digit seconds, plus the number of fractional digits allowed. The number of fractional digits is from one to six inclusive).

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

If your specified format includes microseconds (for example, %ss.4), then the position of the decimal point is inferred in the decimal value. The position of the decimal point does not have to coincide with the specified scale of the decimal (for example, scale = 4).

  • Input: time (time) [, format (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimedec contains the decimal value 200658, then the following function returns the time 20:06:58:

DecimalToTime(mylink.mytimedec)

If the column mylink.mytimedec contains the decimal value 580620, then the following function returns the time 20:06:58:

DecimalToTime(mylink.mytimedec, “%ss%nn%hh”)

DecimalToTimestamp

Returns the given packed decimal as a timestamp. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the timestamp is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is ” %yyyy%mm%dd%hh%nn%ss”, so, for example, the timestamp 2009-08-25 14:03:22 is stored as the decimal number 20090825140322. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%yyyy/%mm/%dd%hh:%nn:%ss”, because the slash character (/) and the colon character (:) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%yyyy (four-digit year)

%yy (two-digit year)

%NNNNyy (two-digit year with cutoff)

%mm (two-digit month)

%dd (two-digit day of month)

%ddd (three-digit day of year)

%hh (two-digit hours using 24-hour clock)

%nn (two-digit minutes)

%ss (two-digit seconds)

%ss.N (two-digit seconds, plus the number of fractional digits allowed. The number of fractional digits is from one to six inclusive).

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

If your specified format includes microseconds (for example, %ss.4), then the position of the decimal point is inferred in the decimal value. The position of the decimal point does not have to coincide with the specified scale of the decimal (for example, scale = 4).

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp) [, format (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimestampdec contains the value 19580818200658, then the following function returns the timestamp 1958–08–18 20:06:58:

DecimalToTimestamp(mylink.mytimestampdec)

If the column mylink.mytimestampdec contains the decimal value 200658580818, then the following function returns the timestamp 1958–08–18 20:06:58:

DecimalToTimestamp(mylink.mytimestampdec, “%hh%nn%ss%yy%mm%dd”)

DFloatToDecimal

Returns the given dfloat in decimal representation. The argument rtype optionally specifies a rounding type, and is set to one of the following values:

ceil. Round the source field toward positive infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 2, -1.6 -> -1.

floor. Round the source field toward negative infinity. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.4 -> -2.

round_inf. Round or truncate the source field toward the nearest representable value, breaking ties by rounding positive values toward positive infinity and negative values toward negative infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 1, 1.5 -> 2, -1.4 -> -1, -1.5 -> -2.

trunc_zero. Discard any fractional digits to the right of the rightmost fractional digit supported in the destination, regardless of sign. For example, if the destination is an integer, all fractional digits are truncated. If the destination is another decimal with a smaller scale, round or truncate to the scale size of the destination decimal. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.6 -> -1.

  • Input: number (dfloat), [rtype (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.myfloat contains the dfloat number 2.534, the following function returns the decimal number 00000002.54.

DFloatToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”ceil”)

If the column mylink.myfloat contains the dfloat number 2.534, the following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DFloatToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”floor”)

If the column mylink.myfloat contains the dfloat number 2.534, the following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DFloatToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”trunc_zero”)

If the column mylink.myfloat contains the dfloat number 2.534, the following function returns the decimal number 00000002.53.

DFloatToDecimal(mylink.mydec,”round_inf”)

DfloatToStringNoExp

Returns the given dfloat in its string representation with no exponent, using the specified scale.

  • Input: number (dfloat), scale (string)
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.myfloat contains the dfloat number 2.534, then the following function returns the string 00000002.50:

DfloatToStringNoExp(mylink.myfloat,2)

IsValid

Returns whether the given string is valid for the given type. Valid types are “date”, “decimal”, “dfloat”, “sfloat”, “int8”, “uint8”, “int16”, “uint16”, “int32”, “uint32”, “int64”, “uint64”, “raw”, “string”, “time”, “timestamp”, “ustring”. For data types of date, time, and timestamp, you can optionally specify a format string. The format string describes the format that your input data uses when it differs from the default formats for date, time, or timestamp. The default format for date is “%yyyy-%mm-%dd”. The default format for time is “%hh:%mm:%ss”. The default format for timestamp is “%yyyy-%mm-%dd %hh:%mm:%ss”. This function does not log warnings.

  • Input: type (string), teststring (string) [, format (string)]
  • Output: result (int8)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “1”, then the following function returns the value 1.

IsValid(“int8”,mylink.mystring)

If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “380096.06”, then the following function returns the value 0.

IsValid(“int8”,mylink.mystring)

IsValidDate

Returns whether the given value is valid for the type date. This function logs warnings.

  • Input: testdate (date)
  • Output: result (int8)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mydate contains the date 2011-09-13, then the following function returns the value 1.

IsValidDate(mylink.mydate)

If the column mylink.mydate contains the string “380096.06”, then the following function returns the value 0, because the converted string is not a valid date.

IsValidDate(StringToDate (mylink.mydate))

IsValidDecimal

Returns whether the given value is valid for the type decimal. If the allzerosflag is set to 0, then an all-zeroes representation is not valid. The allzerosflag is set to zero by default.

  • Input: testvalue (decimal) [, allzerosflag (uint8)]
  • Output: result (int8)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mynum contains the value 310007.65, then the following function returns the value 1.

IsValidDecimal(mylink.mynum)

If the column mylink.mynum contains the string “wake-robin”, then the following function returns the value 0, because the converted string is not a valid decimal.

IsValidDecimal(StringToDecimal (mylink.mynum))

IsValidTime

Returns whether the given time is valid for the type time.

  • Input: testtime (time)
  • Output: result (int8)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mytime contains the time 23:09:22, then the following function returns the value 1:

IsValidTime(mylink.mytime)

If the column mylink.mydate contains the string “IbnKayeed”, then the following function returns the value 0, because the converted string is not a valid time.

IsValidTime(StringToTime (mylink.mytime))

IsValidTimestamp

Returns whether the given timestamp is valid for the type timestamp.

  • Input: testtimestamp (timestamp)
  • Output: result (int8)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the time 2011-09-13 23:09:22, then the following function returns the value 1:

IsValidTimestamp(mylink.mytimestamp)

If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the string “one of two”, then the following function returns the value 0, because the converted string is not a valid timestamp.

IsValidTimestamp(StringToTimestamp (mylink.mytimestamp))

RawNumAt

Returns the integer value at the specified index value in the specified raw field. The index starts at 0.

  • Input: rawfield (raw), index (int32)
  • Output: result (int32)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.myraw contains a raw value derived from the string “hello”, then the following function returns the integer 0x68 (the ASCII code for the character h):

RawNumAt(mylink.myraw, 0)

If the column mylink.myraw contains a raw value derived from the string “hello”, then the following function returns 0 because the specified index is out of range:

RawNumAt(mylink.myraw, 12)

RawToString

Returns the given raw value as a string representation. You must ensure that the raw input value contains a sequence of bytes that are valid as characters in the target character set in which the output string is used. For example, the raw value { 0xE0 0x41 0x42 } is not a valid sequence of UTF-8 characters, since the lead byte, 0xE0, is supposed to be followed by a byte in the range [0x80..0xBF]. If a raw value { xE0 x41 x42 } is passed to the RawToString function, there could be an error if the output string is then accessed as if it were encoded in UTF-8.

  • Input: rawfield (raw)
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.myraw contains the value { 0x31 0x31 0x30 0x35 0x32 0x32 0x30 0x39 }, then the following function returns the string “11052209”.

RawNumAt(mylink.myraw)

Seq

Generates a numeric code value from an ASCII character. You can optionally specify the allow8bits argument to convert 8-bit ASCII values.

  • Input: Seq (char)
  • Output: result (number)
  • Examples. The following example outputs the character A as the ASCII code 65.

Seq(“A”)

SeqAt

Returns the numeric code point value of the character at the specified position in the given string. The index starts at 0. If the specified index is out of range, the function returns 0.

  • Input: basestring (string), index (int32)
  • Output: result (int32)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “horse”, then the following function returns the value 0x6F (that is, the ASCII value of the character o).

SeqAt(mylink.mystring, 1)

StringToDate

Returns a date from the given string in the given format. You do not have to specify a format string if your string contains a date in the default format yyyy-mm-dd.

  • Input: string (string) [,format (string)]
  • Output: result (date)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mystring contains the string ″1958–08–18″, then the following function returns the date 1958–08–18.

StringToDate(mylink.mystring)

If the column mylink.mystring contains the string ″18:08:1958″, then the following function returns the date 1958–08–18.

StringToDate(mylink.mystring,”%dd:%mm:%yyyy”)

StringToDecimal

Returns the given string as a decimal representation. The argument rtype optionally specifies a rounding type, and is set to one of the following values:

ceil. Round the source field toward positive infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 2, -1.6 -> -1.

floor. Round the source field toward negative infinity. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.4 -> -2.

round_inf. Round or truncate the source field toward the nearest representable value, breaking ties by rounding positive values toward positive infinity and negative values toward negative infinity. For example, 1.4 -> 1, 1.5 -> 2, -1.4 -> -1, -1.5 -> -2.

trunc_zero. Discard any fractional digits to the right of the rightmost fractional digit supported in the destination, regardless of sign. For example, if the destination is an integer, all fractional digits are truncated. If the destination is another decimal with a smaller scale, round or truncate to the scale size of the destination decimal. For example, 1.6 -> 1, -1.6 -> -1.

  • Input: string (string), [rtype (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “19982.22”, and the target is defined as having a precision of 7 and a scale of 2, then the following function returns the decimal 19983.22.

StringToDecimal(mylink.mystring)

If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “19982.2276”, and the target is defined as having a precision of 7 and a scale of 2, then the following function returns the decimal 19983.23.

StringToDecimal(mylink.mystring,”ceil”)

StringToRaw

Returns a string in raw representation.

  • Input: string (string)
  • Output: result (raw)
  • Examples. If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “hello”, and the target column is defined as being of type Binary then the following function returns the value { 0x68 0x65 0x6C 0x6C 0x6F }.

StringToRaw(mylink.mystring)

StringToTime

Returns a time representation of the given string.

  • Input: string (string), [format (string)]
  • Output: result (time)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “20:06:58”, then the function returns a time of 20:06:58.

StringToTime(mylink.mystring)

If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “20: 6:58″, then the function returns a time of 20:06:58.

StringToTime(mylink.mystring,”%(h,s):$(n,s):$(s,s)”)

StringToTimestamp

Returns a time representation of the given string.

  • Input: string (string) [format (string)]
  • Output: result (time)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “1958–08–08 20:06:58”, then the function returns the timestamp 1958–08–08 20:06:58.

StringToTimestamp(mylink.mystring)

If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “8/ 8/1958 20: 6:58”, then the function returns the timestamp 1958–08–08 20:06:58.

StringToTimestamp(mylink.mystring, “%(d,s)/%(m,s)/%yyyy%(h,s):$(n,s):$(s,s)”)

StringToUstring

Returns a ustring from the given string, optionally using the specified map (otherwise uses project default).

  • Input: string (string), [mapname(string)]
  • Output: result (ustring)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mystring contains the string “11052009”, then the following function returns the ustring “11052009”

StringToUstring(mylink.mystring)

TimestampToDate

Returns a date from the given timestamp.

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp)
  • Output: result (date)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–18 20:06:58, then the following function returns the date 1958–08–18:

TimestampToDate(mylink.mytimestamp)

TimestampToDecimal

Returns the given timestamp as a packed decimal. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the timestamp is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is ” %yyyy%mm%dd%hh%nn%ss”, so, for example, the timestamp 2009-08-25 14:03:22 is stored as the decimal number 20090825140322. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%yyyy/%mm/%dd%hh:%nn:%ss”, because the slash character (/) and the colon character (:) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%yyyy (four-digit year)

%yy (two-digit year)

%NNNNyy (two-digit year with cutoff)

%mm (two-digit month)

%dd (two-digit day of month)

%ddd (three-digit day of year)

%hh (two-digit hours using 24-hour clock)

%nn (two-digit minutes)

%ss (two-digit seconds)

%ss.N (two-digit seconds, plus the number of fractional digits allowed. The number of fractional digits is from one to six inclusive).

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

If your specified format includes microseconds (for example, %ss.4), then the position of the decimal point is inferred in the decimal value. The position of the decimal point does not have to coincide with the specified scale of the decimal (for example scale = 4).

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp) [, format (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–18 20:06:58, then the following function returns the decimal value 19580818200658:

TimestampToDecimal(mylink.mytimestamp)

If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–18 20:06:58, then the following function returns the decimal value 200658580818:

TimestampToDecimal(mylink.mytimestamp, “%hh%nn%ss%yy%mm%dd”)

TimestampToString

Returns a string from the given timestamp.

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp) [format (string)]
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–1820:06:58, then the function returns the string “1958–08–1820:06:58”.

TimestampToString(mylink.mytimestamp)

If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–1820:06:58, then the function returns the string “18/08/1958 20:06:58”:

TimestampToString(mylink.mytimestamp, “%dd/%mm/%yyyy %hh:$nn:$ss”)

TimestampToTime

Returns the string representation of the given timestamp.

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp)
  • Output: result (time)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytimestamp contains the timestamp 1958–08–1820:06:58, then the function returns the time 20:06:58:

TimestampToTime(mylink.mytimestamp)

TimeToString

Returns a string from the given time.

  • Input: timestamp (timestamp) [format (string)]
  • Output: result (time)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytime contains the time 20:06:58, then the following function returns the string “20:06:58”:

TimeToString(mylink.mytime)

If the column mylink.mytime contains the time 20:06:58, then the following function returns the string “58:06:20”:

TimeToString(mylink.mytime, “%ss:$nn:$hh”)

TimeToDecimal

Returns the given time as a packed decimal. You can optionally specify a format string that specifies how the time is stored in the decimal number. The default format string is ” %hh%nn%ss”, so, for example, the time 14:03:22 is stored as the decimal number 140322. Format strings can only specify a format that contains numbers. For example, you cannot specify a format string such as “%hh:%nn:%ss”, because the colon character (:) cannot be stored in a packed decimal value. The following tokens are valid for conversions to or from decimal values:

%hh (two-digit hours using 24-hour clock)

%nn (two-digit minutes)

%ss (two-digit seconds)

%ss.N (two-digit seconds, plus the number of fractional digits allowed. The number of fractional digits is from one to six inclusive).

The literal digits 0 to 9 are also valid.

If your specified format includes microseconds (for example, %ss.4), then the position of the decimal point is inferred in the decimal value. The position of the decimal point does not have to coincide with the specified scale of the decimal (for example scale = 4).

  • Input: time (time) [, format (string)]
  • Output: result (decimal)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.mytime contains the time 20:06:58, then the following function returns the decimal value 200658:

TimeToDecimal(mylink.mytime)

If the column mylink.mytime contains the time 20:06:58, then the following function returns the decimal value 580620:

TimeToDecimal(mylink.mytime, “%ss%nn%hh”)

UstringToString

Returns a string from the given ustring, optionally using the specified map (otherwise uses project default).

  • Input: string (ustring) [, mapname(string)]
  • Output: result (string)
  • Examples: If the column mylink.myustring contains the ustring “11052009”, then the following function returns the string “11052009”:

UstringToString(mylink.myustring)

Related References

Number functions

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Developing parallel jobs, Parallel transform functions, Number functions

Understanding the results of AsDouble(), AsFloat(), and AsInteger() transform functions

InfoSphere Information Server InfoSphere, Information Server 11.5.0, Troubleshooting, Troubleshooting InfoSphere DataStage, Troubleshooting specific stages, Transformer Stage, Understanding the results of AsDouble(), AsFloat(), and AsInteger() transform functions

Type conversion functions

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Developing parallel jobs, Parallel transform functions, Type conversion functions

Parallel transform functions

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Developing parallel jobs, Parallel transform functions

IBM InfoSphere DataStage – Parallel Environment Variables

Most of this list of Parallel Environment Variables can be found in the IBM InfoSphere DataStage, Version 11.5 documentation.  However, I have started to find variables,  which I use and are not included in the IBM list.  So, for simplicity, I will make additions and clarifications to the IBM list, as I run across them, on this page.

Performance Tuning

 These environment variable are frequently used in tuning Datastage performance.

  • APT_BUFFER_FREE_RUN (See, also, Buffering)
  • APT_BUFFER_MAXIMUM_MEMORY (See, also,  Buffering)
  • APT_COMPRESS_BOUNDED_FIELDS
  • APT_FILE_IMPORT_BUFFER_SIZE  (See, also, Reading and Writing Files)
  • APT_FILE_EXPORT_BUFFER_SIZE (See, also, Reading and Writing Files)
  • TMPDIR (This variable also specifies the directory for Netezza log files on all operating systems.  Setting TMDIR paths is a Netezza best practice.)

Buffering

These environment variable are all concerned with the buffering InfoSphere DataStage performs on stage links to avoid deadlock situations

  • APT_BUFFER_FREE_RUN
  • APT_BUFFER_MAXIMUM_MEMORY
  • APT_BUFFER_MAXIMUM_TIMEOUT
  • APT_BUFFER_DISK_WRITE_INCREMENT
  • APT_BUFFERING_POLICY
  • APT_DISABLE_ROOT_FORKJOIN

Building Custom Stages

These environment variables are concerned with the building of custom operators that form the basis of customized stages.

  • APT_BUILDOP_SOURCE_CHARSET
  • APT_SINGLE_CHAR_CASE
  • DS_OPERATOR_BUILDOP_DIR
  • DS_OPERATOR_WRAPPED_DIR
  • OSH_BUILDOP_CODE
  • OSH_BUILDOP_HEADER
  • OSH_BUILDOP_NO_OPTIMIZE
  • OSH_BUILDOP_OBJECT
  • OSH_BUILDOP_WRAPPER
  • OSH_BUILDOP_XLC_BIN
  • OSH_CBUILDOP_XLC_BIN
  • OSH_STDOUT_MSG

Compiler

These environment variables specify details about the C++ compiler used by InfoSphere DataStage in connection with parallel jobs.

  • APT_COMPILER
  • APT_COMPILEOPT
  • APT_LINKER
  • APT_LINKOPT

DB2 Support

These environment variables are concerned with setting up access to DB2 databases from InfoSphere DataStage.

  • APT_DB2INSTANCE_HOME
  • APT_DB2READ_LOCK_TABLE
  • APT_DBNAME
  • APT_DEBUG_DB2
  • APT_RDBMS_COMMIT_ROWS
  • APT_TIME_ALLOW_24
  • DB2DBDFT

Debugging

These environment variables are concerned with the debugging of InfoSphere DataStage parallel jobs.

  • APT_DEBUG_OPERATOR
  • APT_DEBUG_MODULE_NAMES
  • APT_DEBUG_PARTITION
  • APT_DEBUG_SIGNALS
  • APT_DEBUG_STEP
  • APT_DEBUG_SUBPROC
  • APT_EXECUTION_MODE
  • APT_NO_PM_SIGNAL_HANDLERS
  • APT_PM_DBX
  • APT_PM_SHOW_PIDS
  • APT_PM_XTERM
  • APT_PXDEBUGGER_FORCE_SEQUENTIAL
  • APT_SHOW_LIBLOAD
  • DS_OSH_WRAPPER_DEBUG_CONNECT
  • DS_OSH_WRAPPER_TIMEOUT
  • DS_PXDEBUG

Decimal Support

These environment variables are concerned with support for decimal columns.

  • APT_DECIMAL_INTERM_PRECISION
  • APT_DECIMAL_INTERM_SCALE
  • APT_DECIMAL_INTERM_ROUNDMODE
  • DS_USECOLPREC_FOR_DECIMAL_KEY

Disk I/O

These environment variables are all concerned with when and how InfoSphere DataStage parallel jobs write information to disk.

  • APT_BUFFER_DISK_WRITE_INCREMENT
  • APT_EXPORT_FLUSH_COUNT
  • APT_IO_MAP/APT_IO_NOMAP and APT_BUFFERIO_MAP/APT_BUFFERIO_NOMAP
  • APT_PHYSICAL_DATASET_BLOCK_SIZE

General Job Administration

These environment variables are concerned with details about the running of InfoSphere DataStage and IBM InfoSphere QualityStage® parallel jobs

  • APT_CLOBBER_OUTPUT
  • APT_CONFIG_FILE
  • APT_DISABLE_COMBINATION
  • APT_DONT_COMPRESS_BOUNDED_FIELDS
  • APT_EXECUTION_MODE
  • APT_FILE_EXPORT_ADD_BOM
  • APT_IMPORT_FORCE_QUOTE_DELIM
  • APT_ORCHHOME
  • APT_STARTUP_SCRIPT
  • APT_NO_STARTUP_SCRIPT
  • APT_STARTUP_STATUS
  • DSForceTerminate
  • DSIPC_OPEN_TIMEOUT
  • DSJOB_DOMAIN
  • DSWaitShutdown
  • DS_FORCE_ABORT_AT_WARN_LIMIT
  • DS_LOG_AUTOPURGE_IGNORE_STATUS

Job Monitoring

These environment variables are concerned with the Job Monitor on InfoSphere DataStage.

  • APT_MONITOR_SIZE
  • APT_MONITOR_MINTIME
  • APT_MONITOR_TIME
  • APT_NO_JOBMON
  • APT_PERFORMANCE_DATA

Lookup support

This environment variable is concerned with lookup tables.

  • APT_LUTCREATE_NO_MMAP

Miscellaneous

These environment variables do not fit into the other categories.

  • APT_AGGREGATOR_NULLABLE_OUTPUT
  • APT_COPY_TRANSFORM_OPERATOR
  • APT_DATASET_FLUSH_NOFSYNC
  • APT_DATASET_FLUSH_NOSYNC
  • APT_DATE_CENTURY_BREAK_YEAR
  • APT_DATE_ADD_ROLLOVER
  • APT_DISABLE_FASTALLOC
  • APT_DONT_OPTIMIZE_MODIFY
  • APT_EBCDIC_VERSION
  • APT_FILE_EXPORT_DEFAULTS_TO_CONDUCTOR
  • APT_FIFO_DIRECTORY
  • APT_IMPEXP_ALLOW_ZERO_LENGTH_FIXED_NULL
  • APT_IMPORT_REJECT_INVALID_CHARS
  • APT_IMPORT_REJECT_STRING_FIELD_OVERRUNS
  • APT_INSERT_COPY_BEFORE_MODIFY
  • APT_ISVALID_BACKCOMPAT
  • APT_OLD_BOUNDED_LENGTH
  • APT_OLD_CUTOFF
  • APT_OUTPUT_LOCALE
  • APT_OPERATOR_REGISTRY_PATH
  • APT_OSL_PARAM_ESC_SQUOTE
  • APT_OSL_RESTORE_BACKSLASH
  • APT_PLAYERS_REPORT_IN
  • APT_PM_ACCEPT_CONNECTION_RETRIES
  • APT_PM_ACCEPT_CONNECTION_TIMEOUT
  • APT_PM_NO_SHARED_MEMORY
  • APT_PM_NO_NAMED_PIPES
  • APT_PM_SCORE_DIR
  • APT_PM_STARTUP_CONCURRENCY
  • APT_RECORD_COUNTS
  • APT_RESPATH
  • APT_SHOW_COMPONENT_CALLS
  • APT_STACK_TRACE
  • APT_SURRKEY_BLOCK_WRITE
  • APT_SURRKEY_LOCKSTATE_RETRIES
  • APT_THREAD_SAFE_FAST_ALLOC
  • APT_TRANSFORM_ABORT_ON_CONVERSION_ERROR
  • APT_TRANSFORM_COMPILE_OLD_NULL_HANDLING
  • APT_TRANSFORM_LOOP_WARNING_THRESHOLD
  • APT_TRANSFORM_OPERATOR_DEBUG
  • APT_USE_CRLF
  • APT_VIEWDATA_TEMP_DIR
  • DSAttLockWait
  • DSE_SLAVE_CLOSE_SOCKET_ON_EXEC
  • DSJobStartedMax
  • DSODBC_EXECUTE_MULTI_STMTS_AS_ONE
  • DSODBC_FATAL_ERRORS
  • DSODBC_NEW_FVMARKERS
  • DSODBC_NO_BIGINT_WARNINGS
  • DSODBC_NO_DB2_DELETE_WARNINGS
  • DSODBC_NO_METADATA_WARNINGS
  • DSR_RECORD_DELETE_BEFORE_WRITERAW
  • DSSocketNotifyTimeout
  • DSWaitResetStartup
  • DSWaitStartup
  • DS_API_DEBUG
  • DS_CHANGE_SEQ_PUT_BEHAVIOR
  • DS_EXECUTE_NO_MASKING
  • DS_HOSTNAME_ALIAS
  • DS_IPCPUT_OLD_TIMEOUT_BEHAVIOR
  • DS_LEGACY_AUDIT
  • DS_LOGDETAIL_INVOCATION_OLDFORM
  • DS_LONG_JOBSTATUS_LOCK
  • DS_MAX_PREC_FOR_FLOATS
  • DS_MMAPPATH
  • DS_MMAPSIZE
  • DS_NO_INSTANCE_PURGING
  • DS_OPTIMIZE_FILE_BROWSE
  • DS_SEQ_BYPASS_CHOWN
  • DS_STATUSSTARTED_CHECK
  • DS_TRX_ALLOW_LINKVARIABLES
  • OSH_PRELOAD_LIBS
  • PX_DBCONNECTHOME
  • DS_USE_OLD_STATUS_PURGE
  • DS_USE_OSHSCRIPT
  • DS_USE_SERVER_AUTH_ONLY
  • ODBCBindingOrder
  • ODBCstripCRLF
  • OSHMON_INIT_RETRY
  • OSHMON_TRACE

Network

These environment variables are concerned with the operation of InfoSphere DataStage parallel jobs over a network.

  • APT_DEBUG_ENVIRONMENT
  • APT_PM_ENV_DEBUG
  • APT_PM_ENV_NOCLOBBER
  • APT_IO_MAXIMUM_OUTSTANDING
  • APT_IOMGR_CONNECT_ATTEMPTS
  • APT_PLAYER_CONNECTION_PORT
  • APT_PM_CONDUCTOR_TIMEOUT
  • APT_PM_CONDUCTOR_HOSTNAME
  • APT_PM_CONNECT_USING_NAME
  • APT_PM_NO_TCPIP
  • APT_PM_NODE_TIMEOUT
  • APT_PM_PLAYER_TIMEOUT
  • APT_PM_SHOWRSH
  • APT_PM_STARTUP_PORT
  • APT_RECVBUFSIZE
  • APT_USE_IPV4

National Language Support (NLS)

These environment variables are concerned with InfoSphere DataStage’s implementation of NLS.

  • APT_COLLATION_SEQUENCE
  • APT_COLLATION_STRENGTH
  • APT_ENGLISH_MESSAGES
  • APT_IMPEXP_CHARSET
  • APT_INPUT_CHARSET
  • APT_OS_CHARSET
  • APT_OUTPUT_CHARSET
  • APT_STRING_CHARSET

Oracle Support

These environment variables are concerned with the interaction between InfoSphere DataStage and Oracle databases.

  • APT_ORACLE_LOAD_OPTIONS
  • APT_ORACLE_NO_OPS
  • APT_ORACLE_PRESERVE_BLANKS
  • APT_ORA_IGNORE_CONFIG_FILE_PARALLELISM
  • APT_ORA_WRITE_FILES
  • APT_ORAUPSERT_COMMIT_ROW_INTERVAL
  • APT_ORAUPSERT_COMMIT_TIME_INTERVAL
  • ODBCKeepSemicolon

Partitioning

The following environment variables are concerned with how InfoSphere DataStage automatically partitions data.

  • APT_NO_PART_INSERTION
  • APT_NO_PARTSORT_OPTIMIZATION
  • APT_PARTITION_COUNT
  • APT_PARTITION_NUMBER

Reading and Writing Files

These environment variables are concerned with reading and writing files.

  • APT_DELIMITED_READ_SIZE
  • APT_FILE_IMPORT_BUFFER_SIZE
  • APT_FILE_EXPORT_BUFFER_SIZE
  • APT_IMPORT_FILE_PATTERN_CMD
  • APT_IMPORT_HANDLE_SHORT
  • APT_IMPORT_PATTERN_USES_CAT
  • APT_IMPORT_PATTERN_USES_FILESET_MOUNTED
  • APT_MAX_DELIMITED_READ_SIZE
  • APT_STRING_PADCHAR

Reporting

These environment variables are concerned with various aspects of InfoSphere DataStage jobs reporting their progress.

  • APT_DUMP_SCORE
  • APT_ERROR_CONFIGURATION
  • APT_MSG_FILELINE
  • APT_PM_PLAYER_MEMORY
  • APT_PM_PLAYER_TIMING
  • APT_RECORD_COUNTS
  • OSH_DUMP
  • OSH_ECHO
  • OSH_EXPLAIN
  • OSH_PRINT_SCHEMAS

SAS Support

These environment variables are concerned with InfoSphere DataStage interaction with SAS.

  • APT_HASH_TO_SASHASH
  • APT_NO_SASOUT_INSERT
  • APT_NO_SAS_TRANSFORMS
  • APT_SAS_ACCEPT_ERROR
  • APT_SAS_CHARSET
  • APT_SAS_CHARSET_ABORT
  • APT_SAS_COMMAND
  • APT_SASINT_COMMAND
  • APT_SAS_DEBUG
  • APT_SAS_DEBUG_IO
  • APT_SAS_DEBUG_LEVEL
  • APT_SAS_DEBUG_VERBOSE
  • APT_SAS_S_ARGUMENT
  • APT_SAS_NO_PSDS_USTRING
  • APT_SAS_SCHEMASOURCE_DUMP
  • APT_SAS_SHOW_INFO
  • APT_SAS_TRUNCATION

Sorting

The following environment variables are concerned with how InfoSphere DataStage automatically sorts data.

  • APT_NO_SORT_INSERTION
  • APT_SORT_INSERTION_CHECK_ONLY
  • APT_TSORT_NO_OPTIMIZE_BOUNDED
  • APT_TSORT_STRESS_BLOCKSIZE

Teradata Support

The following environment variables are concerned with InfoSphere DataStage interaction with Teradata databases.

  • APT_TERA_64K_BUFFERS
  • APT_TERA_NO_ERR_CLEANUP
  • APT_TERA_NO_PERM_CHECKS
  • APT_TERA_NO_SQL_CONVERSION
  • APT_TERA_SYNC_DATABASE
  • APT_TERA_SYNC_PASSWORD
  • APT_TERA_SYNC_USER

Transport Blocks

The following environment variables are all concerned with the block size used for the internal transfer of data as jobs run. Some of the settings only apply to fixed length records.

  • APT_AUTO_TRANSPORT_BLOCK_SIZE
  • APT_LATENCY_COEFFICIENT
  • APT_DEFAULT_TRANSPORT_BLOCK_SIZE
  • APT_MAX_TRANSPORT_BLOCK_SIZE
  • APT_MIN_TRANSPORT_BLOCK_SIZE

Related References

TMPDIR

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, Connecting to data sources, Databases, Netezza Performance Server, Environment variables: Netezza connector, TMPDIR

Environment Variables

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, InfoSphere DataStage and QualityStage, Reference, Parallel Job Reference, Environment Variables

Environment Variables For The Parallel Engine

InfoSphere Information Server, InfoSphere Information Server 11.5.0, Installing, Installing IBM InfoSphere Information Server software, Configuring software, Configuring a parallel processing environment, Setting environment variables for the parallel engine, Environment variables for the parallel engine